4 June 2008

Kefala, Maiden and Stewart read at UTS, Sydney

Reading/performing are:
  • Antigone Kefala
  • Jennifer Maiden
  • Amanda Stewart
Music from
  • David Finch

Thursday the 12th of June

UTS Studio (Note: NOT The Loft), 6.30 (for 7) pm

Dear friends, poets and lovers of The Word— Come and join us for an evening of poetic pleasures with three of Australia’s most diverse and accomplished poetic voices. On Thursday the 12th of June, Antigone Kefala, Jennifer Maiden and Amanda Stewart will be performing at the UTS studio. Their work spans a huge aesthetic spectrum, from variations on traditional prose forms to abstracted experimental poetics, and this promises to be reading not to be missed.

Doors open at 6.30 – come down and join us for a drink before the show. Readings will begin shortly after 7.

The UTS Studio/Performance Space, Building 3 (Bon Marché), Room 105

(Corner of Harris Street and Broadway Road, Broadway. Entry on Harris St)

Entry: $5/$3 for Students and working/unworking poor

For More Information... Berndt Sellheim: 0420 243 751 / berndt.sellheim@uts.edu.au

The Loft Readings could not continue without the support of the Writing and Cultural Studies Area at the University of Technology, and generous funding from The Literature Board of The Australia Council for the Arts.

Antigone Kefala was born in Romania of Greek parents. She moved with her parents to Greece while still a child, and in 1960 came, via New Zealand, to live in Australia. She writes in both Greek and English, and these diverse influences contribute to a poetry that is haunting and intense. She has published a number of poetry collections, including The Alien, Thirsty Weather, European Notebook and Absence: New and Selected Poems. Her most recent publication is a prose work entitled Sydney Journals: Reflections 1970 – 2000, with Giramondo Press.

Jennifer Maiden was born in Penrith, New South Wales. Thirteen of her poetry collections (one including short stories) and two of her novels have been published. Her most recent collection, Friendly Fire (Giramondo, 2005) won the Age Book of the Year Award, and she has received a swag of other prizes for her work, including, on two occasions, the N.S.W Premier’s Award for Poetry, The Victorian Premier’s Award for Poetry and the Christopher Brennan Award for a lifetime of achievement in poetry.

Amanda Stewart is a Sydney based poet and sound artist. Since the 1970s she has been producing a variety of poetic texts, performances, radio, film and multi-media works in Australia, Japan, the US and Europe. In 1989 she co-founded the performance ensemble Machine for Making Sense, she co-wrote and directed the 1990 film Eclipse of the Man-Made Sun. Her collected works book and CD entitled I/T won the 1999 Anne Elder Award for poetry.

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